Children of prisoners

It's estimated that around 16,500 children are affected by the imprisonment of a parent in Scotland each year.

The Commissioner's office has produced material that highlights the need to make progress in ensuring adequate and timely support for children affected by parental imprisonment, and to raise the profile of the children of prisoners in the criminal justice system. Listed below are research reports related to this issue.

Children of prisoners publications

UN Committee on the Rights of the Child, 58th Session day of general discussion 2011: children of incarcerated parents

Scotland's Commissioner for Children and Young People, August 2011. This paper identifies four groups of issues affecting the children of prisoners and makes five recommendations which the Commissioner respectfully proposes to the Committee for consideration.

Download a PDF of the Commissioner's submission to the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child, 58th Session day of general discussion 2011: children of incarcerated parents.

Not seen. Not heard. Not guilty. The rights and status of the children of prisoners in Scotland: 2011 review

Scotland's Commissioner for Children and Young People, June 2011. This review largely builds on the findings and recommendations of Not Seen. Not Heard. Not Guilty. The Rights and Status of the Children of Prisoners in Scotland published in February 2008 and revised in June 2009.

Download a PDF of Not seen. Not heard. Not guilty. The rights and status of the children of prisoners in Scotland: 2011 review.

Perspectives of children and young people with a parent in prison

Tȧnia Loureiro, March 2010. This report presents the findings of a small-scale pilot study to explore the experiences of children and young people who have had a family member sent to prison.

Download a PDF of Perspectives of children and young people with a parent in prison.

Not seen. Not heard. Not guilty.

Scotland's Commissioner for Children and Young People, February 2008. In this report, former Commissioner Kathleen Marshall argues that children of prisoners don't always have their rights respected, and looks at the laws, policies and practices that mean this is the case.

Download a PDF of Not Seen. Not Heard. Not Guilty.